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PostPosted: February 23rd, 2006, 3:35 pm 
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Let's put it to rest folks.

To be considered an Islander you must be born here. Full stop.

PFA's are treated no differently then Islanders. If you have a problem, Islanders will help out first then ask where you are from.

Like any other small community in the world - when strangers move in - the community takes a while to adjust to the newcomers. You build your own nest - move into a community and behave like an ass - expect to be treated like an ass. Move into a community and immiediatly try to take over - people will be stand offish. After all - who are you to change 200 years of the way things are done?

Move nto the community - get to know the neighbours - start to participate in community events - try to become an integeral part of the community - well you just might find people a little more accepting. You will always be a PFA - but over time you will become part of the community.

200 years ago everyone here was a PFA.

Phil


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PostPosted: February 23rd, 2006, 3:39 pm 
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Well put!

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PostPosted: February 23rd, 2006, 3:47 pm 
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Yes, very well put!


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PostPosted: February 23rd, 2006, 4:07 pm 
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Sorry to hijack the thread, but given there is a teacher posting her I thought I'd ask: Exactly how bad is the job situation for teachers in PEI?

While we will be living primarily on my salary if and when we move, my wife will be looking for employment on the Island as a teacher, most likely with the Eastern School Board. She's currently working as a full-time teacher with the Ottawa School board and has been for the last 6 years.

I realize the chances of her landing a full-time job right off the bat are slim to none, but is there at least some work as a substitute teacher/occasional teacher?


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PostPosted: February 23rd, 2006, 4:15 pm 
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There is a lot of work for subs here. The process is fairly easy - you register with the School Board and they add your name to a list.

However - many subs will also visit all the school they are interested in teaching in - try to meet the principal or vice - and leave a stack of business cards or info in the teacher's lounge.

Phil


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PostPosted: February 23rd, 2006, 4:34 pm 
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I think that people who are from here dno't realize how they treat PFA's sometimes... yes, I was welcomed, eventually... but, like I said, I was a preteen when I got here.. kids are different than adults.. as it is, it's only the occaisional a**hole who says anything about me not being from here... and I pointed one out in my previous post..

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PostPosted: February 23rd, 2006, 7:05 pm 
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A lot depends on the community and immediate neighbours -- whether it's C-town or Summerside or some of the villages where people's families have been around for over 200 years.

The upside for some newcomers is that they don't arrive with 200 years of baggage! And that's no joke -- man, some feuds have been festering for so long that the islanders involved really have no idea how the hell they got started! :lol:

I know people who just hate their neighbours' guts with a passion that's hard to imagine! Man, people can get nasty, and it's incredible that they're not at all shy about recruiting their kids into the grand ole family feudin' tradition.

I've known some new arrivals who've had a great time in their new home just because their neighbours have been delighted to meet someone with no local history whatsoever -- no family ties gone bad, no bitterness over politics … nothin'. Sometimes it's good to start with a blank slate.

However, staying out of the community minefield can be another matter ... :wink:


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PostPosted: February 23rd, 2006, 9:33 pm 
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Why hasn't anyone mentioned that we all eat seafood/lobster for breakfast, lunch and supper or that we all work on farms or that we all draw unemployment yearly or that we are all uneducated. Come on now people..............tell the truth..................because we all know it's the truth...... :lol: :wink:


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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 12:10 am 
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Well, I can say that as an American living on PEI (a Southern gal by birth at that) I am about as "from away" as one can get. lol

I don't ever expect to be considered an Islander, and I don't want to be....that's not who I am....just like an Islander couldn't come down South and ever be a "real" Southerner. What we can do if we want, is to embrace and enjoy our new homes as who we are.

I know back home, an Islander would be welcomed into the area and treated warmly...people wouldn't care if the Islander considered themselves to be "one of us" or not...if the Islander was a good person who showed admirable qualities...they would be "one of our own" regardless. Hey if he or she could get out there and work to help their neighbor, it doesn't matter how different you sound or where you come from. You are "good people" then.

It's about showing respect and making others feel welcome. Everyone deserves to have that. :)

I have been treated with kindness since I've moved up here. Sure, people seem to always look at my license plates... and ask me if I am going to AVC etc or what my story is...but that's fine, that's just human nature.

Some of my best friends now are from here. Even though, I am not an islander, PEI still feels like my home at times now for sure. There's noone who can tell me if that's "right" or not, it's how *I* feel... if that makes sense.

I don't see how many think islanders frown on newbies. If anything, nature has taught society that different examples of the gene pool coming into an area is a good thing! LOL ;)


Last edited by SAPPHIRE_PHOENIX on February 24th, 2006, 12:24 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 12:21 am 
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SAPPHIRE_PHOENIX wrote:
Well, I can say that as an American living on PEI (a Southern gal by birth at that) I am about as "from away" as one can get. lol

I have been treated with kindness since I've moved up here. Sure, people seem to always look at my license plates... and ask me if I am going to AVC etc or what my story is...but that's fine, that's just human nature. Noone has ever been rude, always very nice.

Some of my best friends now are from here. Even though, I am not an islander, PEI still feels like my home at times now for sure. There's noone who can tell me if that's "right" or not, it's how *I* feel... if that makes sense.

I don't see how many think islanders frown on newbies. If anything, nature has taught society that different examples of the gene pool coming into an area is a good thing! LOL ;)


LOL Sapphire...welcome to our pool !!!

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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 8:38 am 
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eric wrote:
Sorry to hijack the thread, but given there is a teacher posting her I thought I'd ask: Exactly how bad is the job situation for teachers in PEI?

While we will be living primarily on my salary if and when we move, my wife will be looking for employment on the Island as a teacher, most likely with the Eastern School Board. She's currently working as a full-time teacher with the Ottawa School board and has been for the last 6 years.

I realize the chances of her landing a full-time job right off the bat are slim to none, but is there at least some work as a substitute teacher/occasional teacher?


Hi Eric,
Your path and mine are very similar. I was teaching in Metcalfe, Ontario just before I moved here.

It is good that you will be living off your salary when you first move here. My wife and I are trying to live on my salary, which until very recently was not year round. It was hard, and is hard, but the cool thing about PEI is that it is manageable. Teachers get paid fairly well here, but obviously your wife will be making considerably less than what she's making as a level 6 in Ottawa... which I'd assume is somewhere near $65,000 or more.

There are more opportunity for work as a teacher in the Western School Board, where I work, than in the Eastern School Board. There are more jobs in the East, but more people vying for them, and more substitutes there than in the West. It is generally understood that more people want to work in the East because of Charlottetown... I suggest that if your wife wants to get some work, advise her to go to the schools outside of the city. That's where she'll get some good sub work... For the last 8 months I've worked in Miscouche, which is west of Summerside, and now I'm working in Westisle Composite High School, which is an hour and a half drive from Charlottetown, where I live. Obviously if I had my choice I wouldn't be making this drive every day, but when you get a job offered to you, you take it... that's the way it works here...

Oh and I should say, that on average, most subs are usually subs for about an average of 3+ years before they get offered a contract, and even at that, teachers have to have two full years of work, September to June in the same schools before they get a full contract. Those first two years are called Probationary 1 and Probationary 2. Once you finish your second full year of work you are offered tenured status....

Hope this helps. If you have any more questions about teaching on PEI I'd be glad to help...

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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 8:46 am 
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philipw wrote:
To be considered an Islander you must be born here. Full stop.

Or be an NHL player who has a grandmother living in Tignish or whose parents are from the Island or some other tenuous Island connection :wink:

philipw wrote:
PFA's are treated no differently then Islanders.

Not quite true.

While the problem is not quite so prevalent these days as it used to be - especially in Charlottetown which was forced to become a little more cosmopolitan because of DVA - PFA's will still likely encounter the occasional shun because of their "from away" status.

I know that we experienced some of it when we moved to Summerside from Montreal in 1984 ... and I know that we were cut a great deal of "slack" because of the status of my father's family in Summerside i.e. there were a few occasions when I could feel the cold shoulder about to happen ... until I would mention my lineage ... then there was some grudging acceptance. Sometimes that wasn't enough though, lol ... one person actually told me "We really like you guys but there is no sense in allowing a friendship to develop because you PFA's always end up moving away in a few years." Others resented me because I had taken a job away from an Islander (despite the fact that there were no Islanders with my particular skill set and that my efforts led to my company being able to expand to the point where they could hire at least 100 new employees).

However, those incidents probably only numbered maybe a dozen in the first year or two. There were 3 or 4 times the number of positive experiences meeting people over those first couple of years and many more since.

Perhaps some of us folks from away are more sensitive to this sort of treatment because it may be practically non-existant in the more cosmopolitan areas we come from and we notice it more.

Yes, it happens less these days and especially less in Charlottetown, but it still happens. But it is not a unique Island trait ... it happens in small communities everywhere.


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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 9:21 am 
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I'm from away although my wife is an Islander. I was warned to have nothing to do with one neighbour when we bought the farm. I was aprehensive about meeting him, but he turned out to be one of the best neighbours I ever had and we developed a dam good friendship. With others, sometimes in a 'discussion', I get "well what do you know you're from away" but I've heard the same people say, "Well what do you know, your'e from da crick", or some other locale. All in all, I've found the Islanders to be friendly - it's these people from away you have to watch. :wink:

'From-Away', my mother was born and raised in Metcalfe - small world.

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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 9:35 am 
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I think it is important to mix it up and accept PFA's only because these people are coming with potentially good or new ideas for advancement of the province based on their varying experiences of living elsewhere...yes, we can't just jump on board and make change because "change is scary"...but to keep doing the same thing over and over because it's been done that way for a hundred years, so why bother looking for another more efficient, safer, easier way is silly.


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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 10:03 am 
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paella wrote:
I think it is important to mix it up and accept PFA's only because these people are coming with potentially good or new ideas for advancement of the province based on their varying experiences of living elsewhere...yes, we can't just jump on board and make change because "change is scary"...but to keep doing the same thing over and over because it's been done that way for a hundred years, so why bother looking for another more efficient, safer, easier way is silly.

I think you'll find that is the crux of the issue for some ... some Islanders will get their backs up if a PFA offers criticism, even if the intent is meant to be constructive based upon that PFA's experience or knowledge and even if done in a friendly manner.

My father, born and raised on the Island of a family that has been here since the 1790's, always used to tell me that the mentality of resentment towards PFA's was an unconscious expression of the inferiority complex of Islanders ... for whatever reasons - political, economic, geographic - the Island always seemed to lag behind the rest of Canada, and Islanders could see this whenever they travelled off-island and therefore this inferiority complex developed. Just like the general inferiority complex of Canadians in relationship to the United States and the resultant resentment of Americans.

That is slowly changing. Direct long distance dialing was only coming to the Summerside area in the early 80's, 20 years after most of the rest of Canada, ATM's were making their appearance in Summerside in the early 90's, 10 years after most of the rest of Canada, flashing orange lights on school buses appeared only 5 years after the last of the other 9 provinces had adopted the system ... the gap is narrowing and these days it is hard to find (material) areas where the Island is lacking in comparison to the rest of Canada ... and therefore hopefully the inferiority complex is diminishing with each succeeding generation.


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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 10:31 am 
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paella wrote:
I think it is important to mix it up and accept PFA's only because these people are coming with potentially good or new ideas for advancement of the province based on their varying experiences of living elsewhere...yes, we can't just jump on board and make change because "change is scary"...but to keep doing the same thing over and over because it's been done that way for a hundred years, so why bother looking for another more efficient, safer, easier way is silly.


Silly is not the proper word to describe this disfuntion, ... the Island mantra goes like this, ...

We are we tar did,
I am sofa king we tar did.

One would think that with a population of 130,000 for the past 100 years, ... great change could occur, .... yep, ... We tar did.


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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 10:58 am 
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daval wrote:
a population of 130,000 for the past 100 years


qoth the we tar did :roll:


PEI did not hit the 100,000 mark until the 1961 census.

100 years ago, it was more in the 80,000's

But let's not let facts get in the way of a good rant, eh? :lol:


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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 11:10 am 
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From-Away wrote:
Hi Eric,
Teachers get paid fairly well here, but obviously your wife will be making considerably less than what she's making as a level 6 in Ottawa... which I'd assume is somewhere near $65,000 or more.


From-Away,

I really appreciate you talking the time to reply and giving an idea of what to expect. We're in the midst of perhaps making a drastic change in life and the one piece of information I couldn't get is what the job situation is for teachers.

I will be tele-commuting and thus bringing my job with me, so we can easily get by on my salary. However, my wife loves teaching and the sense of satisfaction that comes from the job. She is having a hard time coming to grips with giving up a good career for something unknown. We were worried that there would be absolutely no work for her and that she would be sitting at home for weeks on end.

Do you have any idea what the salary difference is? She currently is at an A4 level with the Ottawa Board, which is the top level, and has 10 years of post-secondary including a 3 year teaching degree from Mcgill, and she is certificed for K to 8. You are bang-on on the salary.

Also, would you happen to know what they pay subs?

From-Away wrote:

I suggest that if your wife wants to get some work, advise her to go to the schools outside of the city.



If all goes well, we will be living near Peakes and so we are probably well situated for her to sub for any schools east of Charlottetown. At least in PEI we don't have to contend with a separate Catholic board.

If you don't mind my asking, can you give me a rough idea of how many days a week you were getting as a sub (ignoring your EOT)?

I know what you mean by city/country schools. When she was paying her dues here in Ottawa (subbing), it was frequently the schools out in the country (Carp, Fitzroy Harbour) that were starving for subs because people from the city weren't willing to drive out that far. People who were willing to go out got put on the shortlist and work was fairly steady even though it was a small number of schools. This quickly turned into an EOT for her, which turned into a full-time position.

Again, thank you for taking time to answer my questions. It really takes a weight off our shoulders to have some idea of what to expect.


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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 11:20 am 
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Just like the general inferiority complex of Canadians in relationship to the United States and the resultant resentment of Americans.


Quite true. I know some friends up here kinda had their own ideas about Americans...then they became friends with one. ;)

You'd be surprised because some have these ideas in their heads what they think Americans are like...and sometimes, it's not based on anything fair just what they have heard, etc.

I'll never forget sitting a Tim Horton's with a friend. She goes "You know, you are the first American I've ever talked to or ever been friends with."

"Oh yeah?" I say kinda smirking, "Not what you expect me to be huh?

She laughs "Not in the slightest bit."

I reply "Thank you, that's the best compliment I've gotten in a long while."

:lol: :wink:


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PostPosted: February 24th, 2006, 11:41 am 
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Kreskin wrote:
daval wrote:
a population of 130,000 for the past 100 years


qoth the we tar did :roll:


PEI did not hit the 100,000 mark until the 1961 census.

100 years ago, it was more in the 80,000's

But let's not let facts get in the way of a good rant, eh? :lol:


Hmmm, what can I say? foiled again!


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